Gentlemen`s Agreement with Japan Definition

Gentlemen`s Agreement Definition: Understanding the Pact between Japan and the United States

The Gentlemen`s Agreement between Japan and the United States is a historical pact that resulted in limiting the numbers of Japanese immigrants into the United States. The agreement was made in 1907 and was ratified in 1908. The agreement ultimately ended in 1924.

The Gentlemen`s Agreement was a pact made between the United States and Japan in which Japan agreed to limit the number of Japanese immigrants coming into the United States voluntarily. The United States, in return, agreed to stop discrimination against Japanese immigrants already in the country. The pact was not an official treaty but was rather an informal agreement between the two nations.

The agreement was reached after years of tension and growing concerns about the growing presence of Japanese immigrants in the United States. The Japanese immigrants were not well received by the American public, and there was a growing concern that their presence would threaten American jobs and wages.

To address these concerns, President Theodore Roosevelt, together with the Japanese government, reached a Gentlemen`s Agreement. The pact was later ratified by President William Howard Taft in 1908.

The pact contained three main provisions. First, Japan was to stop issuing passports to its citizens who intended to move to the United States for work. Second, the United States agreed not to impose any laws that would restrict Japanese immigration. Lastly, the United States agreed to allow the wives of Japanese immigrants already in the country to join their husbands.

The Gentlemen`s Agreement effectively ended Japanese immigration to the United States for more than a decade, but it did not address the discrimination that Japanese immigrants already in the country faced. The Japanese immigrants faced discrimination in education, employment, and housing.

In 1924, the United States passed the Immigration Act, which placed strict quotas on immigration from Japan, eventually leading to the total cessation of Japanese immigration to the United States.

In conclusion, the Gentlemen`s Agreement between Japan and the United States was a historical pact that limited Japanese immigration to the United States. The agreement was reached after years of tension and concern over the growing presence of Japanese immigrants in the United States. Although it was not an official treaty, it had significant implications for Japanese immigration to the United States and the relations between the two countries.

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